News Hub - Scientific and Academic News from Trusted Sources

Browse News by A-Z Index: ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ#0123456789

This may look like yet another video of a dividing cell, but there’s a catch. You are looking at chromosomes (red) being pulled apart by the spindle (green), but it’s not a cell, because there’s no cell membrane. The new technique developed by Ivo Telley from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, allows scientists to study cell division without cell membrane.
A research team of scientists from EMBL Grenoble and the IGBMC in Strasbourg, France, have, for the first time, described in molecular detail the architecture of the central scaffold of TFIID: the human protein complex essential for transcription from DNA to mRNA.
Researchers at EMBL are one step closer to understanding how embryos develop and grow while always keeping the same proportions between their various parts. Their findings, published today in Nature, reveal that scaling of the future vertebrae in a mouse embryo is controlled by how the expression of some specific genes oscillates, in a coordinated way, between neighbouring cells.
Researchers at EMBL are one step closer to understanding how embryos develop and grow while always keeping the same proportions between their various parts. Their findings, published today in Nature, reveal that scaling of the future vertebrae in a mouse embryo is controlled by how the expression of some specific genes oscillates, in a coordinated way, between neighbouring cells.
Researchers at EMBL are one step closer to understanding how embryos develop and grow while always keeping the same proportions between their various parts. Their findings, published today in Nature, reveal that scaling of the future vertebrae in a mouse embryo is controlled by how the expression of some specific genes oscillates, in a coordinated way, between neighbouring cells.
We all have E.coli bacteria in our gut but each of us carries a version that is genetically slightly different. The same can be said of most gut microbes: our own gut metagenome, that is the collection of all the genes of all our gut microbes, appears to be really specific to each of us, and to remain stable over time.
We all have E.coli bacteria in our gut but each of us carries a version that is genetically slightly different. The same can be said of most gut microbes: our own gut metagenome, that is the collection of all the genes of all our gut microbes, appears to be really specific to each of us, and to remain stable over time.
EMBL scientists and colleagues in the 1000 Genomes Project present the first map of human genetic variation that combines everything from tiny changes in the genetic code to major alterations in our chromosomes, based on the genomes of 1092 healthy people from Europe, the Americas and East Asia. Their results, published in Nature, open new approaches for research on the genetic causes of disease.
EMBL scientists and colleagues in the 1000 Genomes Project present the first map of human genetic variation that combines everything from tiny changes in the genetic code to major alterations in our chromosomes, based on the genomes of 1092 healthy people from Europe, the Americas and East Asia. Their results, published in Nature, open new approaches for research on the genetic causes of disease.
EMBL scientists and colleagues in the 1000 Genomes Project present the first map of human genetic variation that combines everything from tiny changes in the genetic code to major alterations in our chromosomes, based on the genomes of 1092 healthy people from Europe, the Americas and East Asia. Their results, published in Nature, open new approaches for research on the genetic causes of disease.
Syndicate content